Page 2 of 2

Re: NinjaFlex vs. Form Futura Flex Eco

Posted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 1:35 am
by JuliaDee
So I'm not totally nuts - this user had to use slower speeds and higher-than-recommended temp, same as me :)

Most of the time I don't need a lot of precision in a rubber part, so I will still find this material useful, but of course I'd love to do better now that I know results such as those demonstrated by FD_engineer are possible.

Thanks for your experienced comments and guidance!

Re: NinjaFlex vs. Form Futura Flex Eco

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 1:14 am
by JuliaDee
I spent some more time with this today and got much better results. I forced myself to stay with 210C per FD_engineer's recommendation. Initially I had a "motor-clicking" jam (using my spring-loaded Drew feeder). I went to withdraw the filament, and it was jammed in reverse, too! So I took it apart and found that the filament had actually wrapped backwards around the feed gear. Once I withdrew it completely I saw some kinks that indicated maybe some other badness had happened while it was inside. Then I noticed my heater block was clamped such that the down tube wasn't butted right up against the feeder outlet; there was about 1/4" of gap (note this was not the case with my Afinia the other day, that one was butted up against the feeder). So I moved the heater block up and tried again, and it worked for a while, then it stopped feeding. I think the cause this time was twofold: inadequate pressure from the spring, and too much pull required to get the filament off the spool. I tightened the spring a turn and babysat the spool during the print so there'd be no tension, and the print ended up coming out quite well as shown in the photos. Maybe not as good as FD's Makerbot print, but a lot better than my first try at 230-240C and 0.2mm.

I also tried "Normal" and "Fast" speed to test some of Roller's comments, but that was totally not happening, at least at 210C. The filament doesn't feed fast enough at this temp to keep up with the demand at those speeds, and the extruder ends up pushing a glob around instead of laying down a bead. Even on "Fine" speed it has some trouble keeping up when support is being printed. This might be related also to the length of the downtube - there's a good 15-20mm I think between the feed gear and the hot end, and you're basically pushing a very floppy noodle in there and hoping it doesn't buckle. I don't know if other extruders like the MB have a shorter distance there.

Next I want to see if these materials stick to each other and to ABS :)

210C, "Fine" speed, 0.25mm layer height. Form Futura Flex EcoPLA in black, NinjaFlex in red.
IMG_6057.JPG
IMG_6057.JPG (74.82 KiB) Viewed 4383 times
IMG_6054.JPG
IMG_6054.JPG (92.1 KiB) Viewed 4383 times
IMG_6055.JPG
IMG_6055.JPG (90.5 KiB) Viewed 4383 times

Re: NinjaFlex vs. Form Futura Flex Eco

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 9:10 am
by wilsonj
Nice work Julia. Not sure if it is the colour, but the ninja flex actually looks better than the formfutura in that photo.

Re: NinjaFlex vs. Form Futura Flex Eco

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 12:53 pm
by JuliaDee
wilsonj wrote:Nice work Julia. Not sure if it is the colour, but the ninja flex actually looks better than the formfutura in that photo.
Yes, it does, Jamie. But looks are usually secondary for me with rubber parts - I just like having a choice of hardnesses now, and there is a very big difference in hardness between the two. And of course, the Flex Eco is much easier to print with - never a feed issue.