Zim

Talk about anything.
Post Reply
User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Sat Sep 14, 2013 2:17 am

An absolutely beautiful printer, and the most professional and detailed Kickstarter program I've ever seen.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/141 ... nter-fully

It's got a boatload of great features, which unfortunately does not include a heated bed. Although if it really does PLA well, it might be worth plonking down $800 just to be able to get those juicy translucent and metallic PLA colors that we can't do on the Up. Not to mention dual extrusion / dissolvable support, built-in wi-fi and webcam with iPhone remote control, and a really cool-looking blue glass build plate.

Edit: Oh, wait, it does have a heated bed option. Hand creeping towards the credit cards...

Robin
Posts: 113
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 6:59 pm

Re: Zim

Post by Robin » Sat Sep 14, 2013 10:18 am

Edit: I am a silly billy, you didn't miss it at all. I must be going blind

You missed the best bit. It says you use 2 print heads, you do your model with one and a water soluble support structure with the other which you then dissolve away.

amd-tec
Posts: 286
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:16 am
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by amd-tec » Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:32 am

Nice indeed.
The funny thing with all manufacturers (makerbot, leapfrog, etc.) who says they have soluble support material, but they never show it how it works? And the does the software generate the support automaticly or has it done manually.

Sofar the only succesful manufacturer seems to be Stratasys, and those machines really works fine.

Or have anybody of you seen when soluble support used in other machines, would like to know ?
"3D design with intelligent printing"
http://www.amd-tec.com

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Sat Sep 14, 2013 5:28 pm

As these are all based on open source software (well Makerbot was kinda, once) whether or not it support doing the support from material from a different extruder is dependent on the slicing program you use. A number of the key slicers do indeed create code that does the primary material from one extruder and teh support material from another - usually PVA. The PVA is then easily dissolved in water (ultrasonic cleaners can help speed the process).

Of course the reason I own an Up which is inferior in specs to to my repraps (can print 200x 200 x200, 50 micron layers, dual extruder and up to 300mm/s) is I don't need to deal with all of this second extruder for support because the support material peels away. I wish someone would do a Kickstarter to create an algorithm for removable support (Up style) for the open source software. I'd donate to that for sure.

User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Sat Sep 14, 2013 5:33 pm

The Up's support removal is wonderful for sure, especially for simple objects with support on accessible/external surfaces, but dissolvable support would be really helpful for more intricate things and those with support in difficult-to access places and/or on delicate structures.

But back on-topic, the Zim team looks like a bunch of highly-skilled and experienced people. If they get funded I could certainly see them writing some proprietary software to slice models and control this printer.

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Sat Sep 14, 2013 5:50 pm

That they may do ... but it's more likely they will use the plethora of slicers already out there... and if they write their own it's still not likely to achieve support removal. No one seems to have cracked that yet in the startups ... It only arrived in Makerware after talks started with Stratasys which I don't think was coincidental.

User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:09 am

Ah, well... I ordered one.

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:18 am

You're a sucker for a good looking printer (secretly me too - though the Buccaneer was more my thing)

User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:23 am

I'd really like to be able to print PLA well, and I'd like to experiment with dual extrusion, so $800 from these guys seems like a no-brainer. My qu-bd RXL will be here sometime within the next month or so but based on other bleeding-edge early adopters' experiences so far, I have some doubt about ever being able to get it working. If I can, it'll be great for big stuff (9x9x9"). If the Zim turns out to be as great as I think it will be, I could donate one of my Ups to a worthy cause to make room for it. OK, have I rationalized enough?

mb20music
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:35 am
Location: USA

Re: Zim

Post by mb20music » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:25 am

They have to raise $260,000 in 38 days, that is a lot of $$$.
Last edited by mb20music on Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:12 am

Yeah, spread the word! :)

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Sun Sep 15, 2013 12:00 pm

mb20music wrote:They have to raise $260,00 in 38 days, that is a lot of $$$.
Having lived in Europe for a while I read that as $260. Should be an easy target ;)

amd-tec
Posts: 286
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:16 am
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by amd-tec » Sun Sep 15, 2013 5:33 pm

roller wrote:As these are all based on open source software (well Makerbot was kinda, once) whether or not it support doing the support from material from a different extruder is dependent on the slicing program you use. A number of the key slicers do indeed create code that does the primary material from one extruder and teh support material from another - usually PVA. The PVA is then easily dissolved in water (ultrasonic cleaners can help speed the process).

Of course the reason I own an Up which is inferior in specs to to my repraps (can print 200x 200 x200, 50 micron layers, dual extruder and up to 300mm/s) is I don't need to deal with all of this second extruder for support because the support material peels away. I wish someone would do a Kickstarter to create an algorithm for removable support (Up style) for the open source software. I'd donate to that for sure.
I`m wondering why they don`t adopt Tiertime Inspire series software to UP! ? What are they waiting for?
"3D design with intelligent printing"
http://www.amd-tec.com

User avatar
JuliaDee
Posts: 959
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 10:00 pm
Location: Connecticut
Contact:

Re: Zim

Post by JuliaDee » Mon Sep 16, 2013 12:01 am

roller wrote:As these are all based on open source software (well Makerbot was kinda, once) whether or not it support doing the support from material from a different extruder is dependent on the slicing program you use.
From the Zimfolk, FWIW: "Regarding the software, we have our own internal board which will handle the slicing and printing. The slicing is done by a slightly modified of the OpenSource slic3R. It does indeed automatically generate supports. We are working on a USB connection which will allow us to handle Windows 8.1 future 3D printer driver. This is a bit tricky as it involves being able to automatically route the flow from either an external USB connection or the ARM board and therefore some modifications to our controller PCB. This should also allow you to use almost any of the OpenSource softwares out there. More on that later."

mb20music
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu Feb 14, 2013 1:35 am
Location: USA

Re: Zim

Post by mb20music » Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:12 pm

Doing a little better than I thought it would, 22 days left, $116,000 to go...

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Wed Oct 02, 2013 5:37 am

JuliaDee wrote:
roller wrote:As these are all based on open source software (well Makerbot was kinda, once) whether or not it support doing the support from material from a different extruder is dependent on the slicing program you use.
From the Zimfolk, FWIW: "Regarding the software, we have our own internal board which will handle the slicing and printing. The slicing is done by a slightly modified of the OpenSource slic3R. It does indeed automatically generate supports. We are working on a USB connection which will allow us to handle Windows 8.1 future 3D printer driver. This is a bit tricky as it involves being able to automatically route the flow from either an external USB connection or the ARM board and therefore some modifications to our controller PCB. This should also allow you to use almost any of the OpenSource softwares out there. More on that later."
It's not easy to remove support though. For some reason developing removable support doesn't appeal to Allesandro and the Slic3 team.

zli
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 4:12 pm
Location: Basel Switzerland

Re: Zim

Post by zli » Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:48 am

very nice printer, but delivery time is march 2014??

User avatar
wilsonj
Posts: 569
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:26 pm
Location: Australia

Re: Zim

Post by wilsonj » Wed Oct 02, 2013 9:03 pm

roller wrote:
JuliaDee wrote:
roller wrote:As these are all based on open source software (well Makerbot was kinda, once) whether or not it support doing the support from material from a different extruder is dependent on the slicing program you use.
From the Zimfolk, FWIW: "Regarding the software, we have our own internal board which will handle the slicing and printing. The slicing is done by a slightly modified of the OpenSource slic3R. It does indeed automatically generate supports. We are working on a USB connection which will allow us to handle Windows 8.1 future 3D printer driver. This is a bit tricky as it involves being able to automatically route the flow from either an external USB connection or the ARM board and therefore some modifications to our controller PCB. This should also allow you to use almost any of the OpenSource softwares out there. More on that later."
It's not easy to remove support though. For some reason developing removable support doesn't appeal to Allesandro and the Slic3 team.
And that will be the downfall of current opens source slicers. I get the impression the developers have never used an UP.
Regards
Jamie
3DPrinterGear.com.au

roller
Posts: 1622
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Re: Zim

Post by roller » Thu Oct 03, 2013 12:04 am

And that will be the downfall of current opens source slicers. I get the impression the developers have never used an UP.
They have and there was a lot of interest early but it seems to have slipped into the too hard basket. Nophead brings it back in discussion with theories about how to do it (from watching an Up) but it never seems to get traction as a point of focus. Slic3r also seems obsessed with tweaking features such that they never have a really solid bug free release. They could settle off the feature throttle a little and focus and getting the most reliable slice possible that would be nice. My fave slicer is no longer Slic3r ... it's moved towards all the things it initially was designed to eliminate.

Post Reply