3D printers Advisors

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sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Mon Nov 18, 2013 3:35 pm

I printed this demon skull [...] for my daughter [...]
Of course, what loving parent wouldn't shower their children with daemon skulls.
Image

As for you two and your attachment fetish (not to mention "poking at hot moving objects" fetish), you could always just us a little bit more wire and mount the switch to the frame.

Unfortunately the "stock" Octave temperate dropping switch has not solved my problem with my prints lifting from my Gekko board, so I have synthesised a new method from what I have read here... I glue-sticked my Gekko board. :) Test print is running now, and actually appears to be working! After 5 certified fails, that's pretty impressive.

Oh, I got some new ABS from wilson, arrived on time, and now I have some t-glasse and some "gold" to play with. Also some clear premium. I really need to try premium again, I found an old waterwheel I printed on the stock white, and it was just so smooth and perfect.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Mon Nov 18, 2013 3:59 pm

That's funny - the last time my daughter (age 28) was in town, I opened Thingiverse and said "pick something you'd like to print". The horned skull in your photo is what she chose :) I used Octave natural ABS and it printed beautifully - I think the lack of colorants makes for excellent prints.

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:09 pm

I also got some natural in my shipment of plastic, so I'll see how it fares. BTW, Most of my friends like that horrid standford bunny... although the most impressive print I have ever done was actually a model toilet in clear ABS.

My glu-stick experiment has ended in an interesting fail:

Image



I ask you, how is that even possible.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:16 pm

If ABS really wants to warp, it will. Getting the raft attached to the platform is only one aspect of the problem, and I have seen the part separate from the raft like yours did on many occasions. Sometimes you just have to change to a material that doesn't warp. I haven't tried a heated enclosure so I don't know how effective that is.

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:37 pm

Hmmm.... I rolled my own heated enclosure the other day, I used a carboard box, which I put over the printer. It did more harm than good. More warping, and the models almost seemed as if they were coming out a little melted.

I still choose to blame the Gekko board. Maybe I'll try that vertical calibration thing in the UP software... pretty sure that wasn't around when I first got the printer.

Besides which, it wasn't that long ago (before Gekko boards) that I printed off this, which I had to tweak to fit in the build volume and not hit my clips. And that doesn't even have a raft. Still, it doesn't have anything printed in the centre either... hmmm....

Image

Maybe I'll try that skull.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:44 pm

Yes, the warpage problem is completely dependent on the part's geometry (and infill, layer thickness, etc. settings). Some don't warp at all, some will warp (in ABS) no matter what you do.

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:17 pm

Maybe it was my flippant usage of hexagons :p

I'm doing a full size skull in glow in the dark, .25mm with the least infill.

BTW, what resolution and speed do you (and everyone else) print at? I find myself at either .25 or .40 at normal speed... but I have no particular reason for choosing that. It's just habit. I've barely ever printed at .20, or .30, and wonder if I'm missing out.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:26 pm

I almost always use "Fast" speed except when printing with elastomeric filament, which requires Fine speed (it would actually prefer even slower). For very small parts with small features and/or requiring detail I occasionally go down to 150 micron layers, but usually use 200 or 250 depending on the shape of the part. For big sculptures it's usually 250 especially if I'm doing it for the first time and I don't want to spend all the time to print at 200 and find out I don't really like it.

Elastomers and nylon often don't like small layer thicknesses - I use 250 for Flex Eco and NinjaFlex. I haven't printed nylon in ages but Taulman recommends a "square" bead, i.e. set the layer thickness the same as your nozzle diameter. I think I remember getting better results with the layer set a little thinner than the nozzle diameter.

chippwalters
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by chippwalters » Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:25 pm

Great thread! Thanks for all the great tips. :D

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:23 pm

chippwalters wrote:Great thread! Thanks for all the great tips. :D
Haha, actually, I was just thinking before, for a meandering thread - it's full of great tips!

@julia, i haven't printed on anything so exotic. I haven't even tried PLA. But the skull finally finished, and it looks pretty damn good. Until this week, I was printing from a Mac, which I read (in here somewhere) doesn't slow down to do the raft. So I tended to avoid fast mode, unless I was attempting some gravity defying stunt. I should give .20mm a go, I think I was biased by a lot of reprappers on thingiverse talking about .25mm.

And in my own designs, I have grown quite font of 1.25mm walls (and floors), ever since printing the lockable box v4. They appear to be able the thinnest stable walls I can get away with, and 1.25 divides into .25mm. I can make a mean cube. What are you printing with all that stylish filament? I find I am mainly printing mice traps, or mice toys lately. At least mice are the right size to benefit from the UP! Plus build area :)

Image
Image

full size picture is at http://nt4.com/ss/skull_glow_in_dark.jpg

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:36 am

The cube and the skull look great! I've noticed that some models just always print well, while others don't. Not sure why, something to do with the CAD output I guess. That skull seems to be one of the foolproof ones. Just about anything from Dizingof printed amazingly well (when his work was available), no matter how impossible it looked.

I don't understand the obsession with thin walls myself - seems to be a popular test of printing ability these days but it hasn't been relevant for anything I've done so far - I usually want thick, strong walls. And as a test of print quality it can be deceptive - there's a $2,000 printer on the market right now that does a great job on single-wall vases, but that's about the only thing it can print successfully, lol.

My main gig these days has to do with percussion instruments, and it turns out there are a lot of uses for rubber things in that field, hence my obsessive interest in and need for good elastomeric filament. I also just think it's so cool to be able to directly print rubber things in arbitrary shapes - this is something you could previously only do via casting or injection molding (or compression molding). It's not like you can machine a block of rubber or glue various rubber parts together easily. Nylon's also been useful for a few parts, as drummers are not known for their gentleness :)

I still haven't gotten around to trying the Lay-Woo or Lay-Brick I bought a few months ago, but those are for the hobby side of my interest, not the professional side. Taulman is sending me a replacement spool of T-Glase since the early one I bought is totally oval and won't feed. I'm really looking forward to working it for its reputed strength - "like printing with steel" I think someone said.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Tue Nov 19, 2013 3:40 am

Oh, and P.S.: I happened to look at my Afinia User Manual today for the first time (I've had the printer for 8 months, lol) and there are a few paragraphs in it regarding warpage. They say that to minimize warpage you should do everything you can to make the entire printing process as fast as possible from start to finish - fast speed setting, minimal infill, one part rather than multiple parts on the bed, etc.

chippwalters
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by chippwalters » Tue Nov 19, 2013 4:22 am

JuliaDee wrote:Oh, and P.S.: I happened to look at my Afinia User Manual today for the first time (I've had the printer for 8 months, lol) and there are a few paragraphs in it regarding warpage. They say that to minimize warpage you should do everything you can to make the entire printing process as fast as possible from start to finish - fast speed setting, minimal infill, one part rather than multiple parts on the bed, etc.
Thanks for that, Julia. One would think even a newbie like myself would have read the manual!

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Wed Nov 20, 2013 3:43 pm

" as fast as possible from start to finish " ... clearly written by a man.

That's all the excuse I need, one model coming up fast, .30mm and min. infill. (larger z-axis = faster print).

Odd that you mention that, because in the last print of my "Mouse Drinker" (sorry, haven't thought of a good name for yet), I set a pause at 10mm so I could check to see whether I might actually have a watertight print. But as a result, I got a crack there that I only noticed when it finished. Lesson learned.

And printing single pieces is something I would also have to agree with, since the Mouse Drinker was in two pieces, and warped every time. But just printing the "water tank" didn't cause any issues.

It's not that I'm obsessed with wall thickness (or thinness), it's just that after printing that cube, I noticed that 1.25mm walls always come out printed two layers thick, and never infill. That means faster printing for me, and less wastage. Perfect for printing mazes for my mice. It also produces a very trippy effect with clear ABS, such that the mouse looks 2 dimensional when inside.

Percussion Instruments. That must win an award for the most specific yet vaguest job description I have ever heard. Congratulations :) Hey, maybe when you try out that plastic wood, you'll be able to print the entire stick! Well, 130mm of it, anyway.

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:34 am

I have found the solution to warpage of big parts.

You add in a thin box that surrounds the model. It stops the thermal air currents from messing with your print.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Fri Dec 13, 2013 1:49 am

sfinktah wrote:I have found the solution to warpage of big parts.

You add in a thin box that surrounds the model. It stops the thermal air currents from messing with your print.
Oh, NOW you tell me, right after I ordered the $200 Octave enclosure!

;)

julia

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wackojacko
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by wackojacko » Fri Dec 13, 2013 4:28 am

Stable support also helps reduce warping
Bruce
http://www.3DPrintingSystems.com

Need help with your printer, check out our Youtube channel.
https://www.youtube.com/user/3dprinting ... /playlists

sfinktah
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by sfinktah » Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:56 am

wackojacko wrote:Stable support also helps reduce warping
To be quite honest, I've never really understood that feature.

@julia - this is just like printing your own enclosure every time. although, if I lived somewhere that shipping was feasible, I'd probably prefer a real enclosure.

the warping of the enclosing box was insane, but the print inside was perfect. those thermal currents must be out to get me.

Image

edit: that's a 1.25mm wall, btw. not that i'm obsessed with the size of my walls.

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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by roller » Sun Dec 15, 2013 6:33 am

It's a good idea if you have plastic and time to burn but it doesn't always work and there are some prints where printing your own enclosure actually makes the print worse. It's rare but it does happen.

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JuliaDee
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Re: 3D printers Advisors

Post by JuliaDee » Sun Dec 15, 2013 2:11 pm

sfinktah wrote:
wackojacko wrote:Stable support also helps reduce warping
To be quite honest, I've never really understood that feature.
If you've got an overhang up high on a tall part, the normal support can end up being wobbly, and when the overhang is finally printed the support may move around a bit. Stable Support makes more, um, stable, support. That's my understanding anyway.

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