Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

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benjamjo
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Joined: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:56 am

Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by benjamjo » Tue Apr 23, 2013 10:31 am

Hi Folks,
I'v just purchased an UP! Plus 3d printer and joined this forum. I have installed the V1.18 software. in setup there are 4 options for fill. can some one please tell me will I be able to adjust the infill to 100%. I need to print a really real solid object not what is offered by software. I have used the densest option but still too weak. is there a way I can actually use percentile to adjust this?

My apologies if this has already been covered here, but I just cant find it. I have spent many hours on this site to no avail. if it has been covered, please point me to it.

Thanks in advance

juancr
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Location: Spain
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Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by juancr » Wed Apr 24, 2013 7:22 am

Wellcome Benjamjo.
Unfortunatelly UP cannot print full solid parts and I think none software/printer of this price can do it. But with the first fill option in the left you can print quite strong parts.
Hope help you.
Regards,
JuanCR
(You should know I do my best with my written english ;-) )

Marcus
Posts: 526
Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2010 9:58 pm
Location: Germany

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by Marcus » Wed Apr 24, 2013 9:35 pm

100% infill will cause horible warping and smudging issues as the material on the bottom and thinner parts cools while thick parts of the models with full infil stay hot...
Usualy with a infil around 70% you will have prints almost as rigid as if solid, usualy you get away with even less.

The main problem with this sort of part printing is the layering. You can treat your model with acetone or laquer to increase stability afterwards, as the acetone/solvent will fuse the layers together more.
Also 3D printing will be less strong and more brittle then injection molding parts (I think pp3dp mentions 30% somewhere but that really depends on the part and orientation).

What do you want to print?
Did you try changing the orientation?
Different number of shell layers/srface layers?

Most of the time you will have to consider FFF printing limitations while in the design process; Usually you only have to make small changes so a part will work and is durable without any trouble. Else get it printed at Shapeways in nylon/wsf or something like that; Also check out something like
http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130408- ... nting.html
or lost-pla-casting for example.

benjamjo
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:56 am

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by benjamjo » Thu Apr 25, 2013 3:21 am

Thank you Juancr and Marcus for your input. Now I know more.

I am a cyclist. I use clip on shoes. The cleats that come with my style of pedals are too soft and wear out quickly. It is well know fact but the Manufacturer refuses to fix the problem. So, I want to print my own with better material. I did but ABS is too brittle and it broke.

Marcus,
1 -What do you mean by changing the orientation buddy? sorry you lost me there.
2- What number of Shell/surface layer would make a part stronger?

3- Can my printer (UP! Plus) use Polycarbonate filament? in some website say the nozzle is not hot enough. they say I need ~290C. . So can I use PC? or even if I can, will it make stronger part?
https://ultimachine.com/category/catalo ... nate-175mm

4 - By the way getting it printed by Shapeways with stronger material is not a bad idea. Also making a mould is a great idea as well. do you think i can use Epoxy for inside the Mold to create the cleat or that is silly suggestion?

Thanks again.

mr6k
Posts: 327
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:47 am

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by mr6k » Thu Apr 25, 2013 8:49 am

Another material that may give you strength but not be brittle is Taluman 618 Nylon. You can find many references to it on this forum.
Marcus's reference to orientation is that as the printer prints infill as a lattice at 45 degrees to the platform's X & Y planes, rotating your print may give better strength. e.g. If you printed a box section without rotation, the box edges would be parallel with the platform's X & Y axis, but the infill lattice (honeycomb) would be diagonally across the box, however if you rotated the box 45 degrees the lattice would be parallel with the box edges. Rotation can also help in terms of strength on actual part faces, needs experimentation.

cheers

Peter

Marcus
Posts: 526
Joined: Thu Nov 04, 2010 9:58 pm
Location: Germany

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by Marcus » Thu Apr 25, 2013 9:28 am

Peter said it all ;-)

The UP is a closed-source machine and designed to work with specific materials with a specific temperature.
This creates reliable prints with constant quality, while on open source printers you may have to tinker with every new spool of material (especially when buying cheap).

I have no idea about how hot the extruder can run without problems, so as Peter said, look up the threads about nylon on here. With Repraps many people created good parts!
As the newer machines' temperature can not be adjusted as easily anymore, check out
http://www.pp3dp.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=3803
Basically you change the sensor (thermistor) resistance to make the software "think" it reaches it's target temperature when it's really a higher (or lower) temperature.

About Orientation:
If you print a thin rod standing, it will break easily as the thing consists of little rings, and it will break as layer bond is not as strong as injection molded parts.
If you print it laying on the bed, the plastic layers will run down the entire length, creating more rigid parts (though "standing" will create smoother roundings and details in some cases).
Otherwise it's as stated from Peter, the fill structure can influence how rigid a part gets.

About resin:
You could try making a cast, but you could also try printing a hollow part and filling it with resin. It will be much heavier but should increase stability.

benjamjo
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Joined: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:56 am

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by benjamjo » Thu Apr 25, 2013 11:08 am

OK Gents, thanks for the explanation, It all makes more sense to me now.
Cheers
Joseph

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rsilvers
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Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by rsilvers » Thu Apr 25, 2013 12:36 pm

You want tro try Nylon. Taulman 645 is stronger than the 618. You can do research, but it may work at your ABS temperature. And it prints on a cold bed but you will want a wide brim.

benjamjo
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Joined: Tue Apr 23, 2013 9:56 am

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by benjamjo » Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:18 am

Will do rsilvers thanks. i will do some research. cheers

beckcopper
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Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2013 5:43 am

Re: Printing Real Solid parts. i.e. 100% infill

Post by beckcopper » Thu Dec 17, 2015 2:08 am

High end 3D printers almost print everything without exceptions. My friends tried a version of hard type foam core posters, he got his idea at xxxxxxx -edited by moderator.

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