Advice on part placement

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LonV
Posts: 220
Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2012 11:53 pm
Location: Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Advice on part placement

Post by LonV » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:47 am

Attached is a part I've been printing for a friend (to refine it), but it's sort of tricky. Basically it's an ID card holder that you'd wear around your neck for work. So it's got a slot all the way through it. My first instinct is to print it flat, but removing support between the top (where the lanyard hole is) is incredibly difficult. So I've been printing it on it's end, which is a really tall part...and sometimes I get odd distortions, like a shifting slightly from left to right as it increases in height. However, the support removal is pretty easy, because it builds a big support from bottom to top in the middle, but since it's open on top, there's no support wedged in between tiny pieces.

What are your thoughts?

2 images of different angles, and 1 how I've been orienting it:
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Ian Smith
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu May 09, 2013 5:46 am

Re: Advice on part placement

Post by Ian Smith » Wed Sep 11, 2013 11:20 am

Why not lay it flat, and print it in two halves, and just use acetone or MEK to glue the two together. Minimal support required and the layers are in the right direction to give the object reasonable strength
I've just done a similar thing with some small tabs for mounting a metal frame onto a flat surface
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Mounting tab.JPG
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amd-tec
Posts: 286
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:16 am
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Re: Advice on part placement

Post by amd-tec » Wed Sep 11, 2013 5:03 pm

LonV wrote:Attached is a part I've been printing for a friend (to refine it), but it's sort of tricky. Basically it's an ID card holder that you'd wear around your neck for work. So it's got a slot all the way through it. My first instinct is to print it flat, but removing support between the top (where the lanyard hole is) is incredibly difficult. So I've been printing it on it's end, which is a really tall part...and sometimes I get odd distortions, like a shifting slightly from left to right as it increases in height. However, the support removal is pretty easy, because it builds a big support from bottom to top in the middle, but since it's open on top, there's no support wedged in between tiny pieces.

What are your thoughts?

2 images of different angles, and 1 how I've been orienting it:
I would still try print it flat, not sure if allready have done this, but open wind barrier. And try get right tools to remove support,
try different kind of screwdrivers with different length. I have found this kind of screwdriver very handy.
Attachments
1_resized.jpg
Driver shape
1_resized.jpg (44.27 KiB) Viewed 4406 times
"3D design with intelligent printing"
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amd-tec
Posts: 286
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2012 6:16 am
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Re: Advice on part placement

Post by amd-tec » Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:14 pm

One thing more.
Have you tried to use support blocks instead of support? They works also nice in that kind of cases.
Leave 0.2 mm or 0.3 mm cap all over the red block and remove it after printing. See sample pics.
block sample.jpg
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blocks.jpg
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blocks.jpg (51.75 KiB) Viewed 4398 times
"3D design with intelligent printing"
http://www.amd-tec.com

juancr
Posts: 90
Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:19 am
Location: Spain
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Re: Advice on part placement

Post by juancr » Thu Sep 12, 2013 8:07 am

In tall and thin parts I put a heater blowing hot air to the piece to avoid heat tensions which can break those thin walls (be careful of blowing air too much hot :mrgreen: )
Regards,
JuanCR
(You should know I do my best with my written english ;-) )

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